Tom Gauld’s Mooncop is about to land

Mooncop has a good job, a nice little house, but very little to actually do. He zooms around in his police-ship, buys coffee and doughnuts and logs into his computer system to work on some admin. But that’s about it.

His quarterly report tells him that, with no crimes reported and none solved, he has a clean sheet – his ‘crime solution rate’ is 100%. But is his reputation enough to keep him there?

Mooncop_Tom-Gauld-6-7

And something’s up with the lunar population – why are people leaving the colony? Has the moon lost its appeal? Mooncop begins to think that he might be better off transferring, too. But he’d miss the views, that’s for sure.

This self-reflection is typical of Gauld’s method of working with storylines that might initially seem bigger than their protagonists. His Goliath book, where the reluctant Biblical giant would rather not have to fight anyone, is a case in point.

In Gauld’s hands, even the moon, the focus for so many dreams of adventure, is really just another setting for a beautifully-observed story of daily life, its worries and frustrations.

Mooncop is a great addition to Gauld’s body of work. It revisits concerns that have become a much-loved part of his oeuvre, but isn’t afraid to let some welcome light into the vast, overwhelming darkness of space.

Mooncop is published next month by Drawn and Quarterly (£12.99). See drawnandquarterly.com and tomgauld.com for more details

Mooncop_Tom-Gauld_8-9
Mooncop_Tom-Gauld_18-19
Mooncop_Tom-Gauld-detail

Kristjana S Williams brings her cartographic art to Rio in time for the Olympics

Kristjana S Williams‘ latest work appears both inside and outside the famous Rio hotel. There are illustrated maps over the reception and concierge desks and a window exhibit depicting various host Olympic cities – including London, Athens and Rio and 2020’s host, Tokyo – which runs behind the hotel and can be viewed from Avenida Nossa Senhora.

Belmond-copacabana-palace-rio-Kristjana-williams7
Belmond-copacabana-palace-rio-Kristjana-williams9
Belmond-copacabana-palace-rio-Kristjana-williams5
Belmond-copacabana-palace-rio-Kristjana-williams1

The projection work consists of a series of animations of butterflies which are beamed onto the building for ten minutes each evening at 7pm. Each butterfly bears a different country’s flag on its wings, reflecting the particular nations who have had success at the Olympics that day.

Belmond-copacabana-palace-rio-Kristjana-williams8
Belmond-copacabana-palace-rio-Kristjana-williams3

Kristjana S Williams is represented by Outline Artists, see also kristjanaswilliams.com. Client: Belmond (Eva Ziegler & Andrea Natal). Creative Director: Adrian Hulf. Animation (projections): Kristjana S Williams in collaboration with Darren Hanson

Martin Firrell brings All Identity is Constructed project to UK billboards

The work, which gives voice to three different identities in a series of 90-second video works, presents the act of choosing one’s identity as a human right.

The new project, says Firrell, is “motivated by a desire to make life easier for people who don’t fit into the usual identity ‘moulds’”. This thinking led him to focus on outdoor advertising, he says, and whether it could be a platform for messages of tolerance.

The three films, featuring Rose, Tyler and Michelle, are shown below and are currently on display on digital billboards across the country.

tyler-300dpi
Top of post and above: Martin Firrell/Martin Firrell Company

“I’m asking society for more ‘elbow room’ in the way we think about identity,” Firrell explains. “I want to support the LGBT+ community,” he says, as well as “anyone who feels the need to make an unusual identity choice in order to feel real to themselves. Acknowledging identity equality is the next major step forward on the road to a fairer and more open society.”

In Complete Hero in 2009, Firrell explored the concept of ‘heroism’ in a series of projections made on the The Guards Chapel of the Household Division of the British Army.

More at allidentity.com – see also @allidentity and #allidentity on Twitter. The project is presented in partnership with Clear Channel, Outdoor Plus and Primesight

World Illustration Awards 2016 winners announced

The awards, presented by the Association of Illustrators in partnership with California’s Directory of Illustration and Somerset House, mark the 40th anniversary of the AOI’s annual celebration of the industry’s best work.

Illustrators from South Korea won both the overall Professional and New Talent Awards, with the top awards going to Jimin Kim (below) and Jungho Lee (above), respectively. The pair also headed up the work in the Books category.

According to the AOI, Lee’s winning project was a hand-drawn book illustration made using graphite and charcoal (a commission for Sang Publishing), while Kim’s Hyde & Seek picture book explored the theme of ‘alter egos’ in the form of a series of black and white etchings (the reader can create different compositions from the sections).

BOOKS NEW TALENT CATEGORY WINNER: Jimin Kim – Hyde & Seek
Top of post: BOOKS PROFESSIONAL CATEGORY WINNER: / OVERALL WINNER PRO: Jungho Lee – Promenade. Above: BOOKS NEW TALENT CATEGORY WINNER: Jimin Kim – Hyde & Seek
SELF INITIATED PROFESSIONAL CATEGORY WINNER: Eunjoo Lee – Utopia
SELF INITIATED PROFESSIONAL CATEGORY WINNER: Eunjoo Lee – Utopia

“I get the impression that the participants are interested in expressive technique to showcase their style,” said Books category judge, Daehyun Kim. “Jungho Lee’s picture book is distinguished not just because of his outstanding technique, but great imagination. I think this is why the jury chose his book as the overall winner.

“I really enjoyed Jimin Kim’s little book,” judge Kim added. “I wanted to peek through the little holes to discover fractions of personality. The title, the story, and the cut-out technique are just in perfect harmony. I’m so proud of the result of the competition!”

ADVERTISING PROFESSIONAL CATEGORY WINNER: Forge & Marrow – Medecine Grown From Science
ADVERTISING PROFESSIONAL CATEGORY WINNER: Forge & Marrow – Medicine Grown From
Science
ADVERTISING NEW TALENT CATEGORY WINNER: Julinu – Maia’s Morning Malaise
ADVERTISING NEW TALENT CATEGORY WINNER: Julinu – Maia’s Morning Malaise

This year’s winning work – over 50 projects – will be shown at an exhibition held at Somerset House’s Embankment East Galleries from August 1-29 (entry is free). It will then tour the UK throughout 2016-17.

The full list of winners is as follows:

Overall Winner New Talent: Jimin Kim
Overall Winner Professional: Jungho Lee
Winner – Advertising New Talent: Julinu
Winner – Advertising Professional: Forge & Morrow
Winner – Books New Talent: Jimin Kim
Winner – Books Professional: Jungho Lee
Winner – Children’s Books New Talent: Ami Shin
Winner – Children’s Books Professional: Alex T. Smith
Winner – Design Professional: Ella Cohen
Winner – Design New Talent: Thoka Maer
Winner – Editorial New Talent: Nancy Liang
Winner – Editorial Professional: Matt Huynh
Winner – Public Realm Professional: Brian Gallagher
Winner – Public Realm Professional: Diego Becas Villegas
Winner – Research & Knowledge Communication New Talent: Eun Jung Bahng
Winner – Research & Knowledge Communication Professional: Florian Bayer
Winner – Self Initiated New Talent: Eunjoo Lee
Winner – Self Initiated Professional: Gigi Rose Gray

More at theaoi.com

PUBLIC REALM PROFESSIONAL CATERGORY WINNER #2: Brian Gallagher – Cromford Mills / Derwent Valley Mills World Heritage Site Gateway Centre
PUBLIC REALM PROFESSIONAL CATERGORY WINNER #2: Brian Gallagher – Cromford Mills / Derwent Valley Mills World Heritage Site Gateway Centre
PUBLIC REALM PROFESSIONAL CATERGORY WINNER #1: Diego Becas Villegas – Nicanor Parra - 100 Years
PUBLIC REALM PROFESSIONAL CATERGORY WINNER #1: Diego Becas Villegas – Nicanor Parra – 100 Years
RESEARCH AND KNOWLEDGE PROFESSIONAL CATEGORY WINNER: Florian Bayer – African Governance Architecture
RESEARCH AND KNOWLEDGE PROFESSIONAL CATEGORY WINNER: Florian Bayer – African Governance Architecture

World Illustration Awards 2016 winners announced

The awards, presented by the Association of Illustrators in partnership with California’s Directory of Illustration and Somerset House, mark the 40th anniversary of the AOI’s annual celebration of the industry’s best work.

Illustrators from South Korea won both the overall Professional and New Talent Awards, with the top awards going to Jimin Kim (below) and Jungho Lee (above), respectively. The pair also headed up the work in the Books category.

According to the AOI, Lee’s winning project was a hand-drawn book illustration made using graphite and charcoal (a commission for Sang Publishing), while Kim’s Hyde & Seek picture book explored the theme of ‘alter egos’ in the form of a series of black and white etchings (the reader can create different compositions from the sections).

BOOKS NEW TALENT CATEGORY WINNER: Jimin Kim – Hyde & Seek
Top of post: BOOKS PROFESSIONAL CATEGORY WINNER: / OVERALL WINNER PRO: Jungho Lee – Promenade. Above: BOOKS NEW TALENT CATEGORY WINNER: Jimin Kim – Hyde & Seek
SELF INITIATED PROFESSIONAL CATEGORY WINNER: Eunjoo Lee – Utopia
SELF INITIATED PROFESSIONAL CATEGORY WINNER: Eunjoo Lee – Utopia

“I get the impression that the participants are interested in expressive technique to showcase their style,” said Books category judge, Daehyun Kim. “Jungho Lee’s picture book is distinguished not just because of his outstanding technique, but great imagination. I think this is why the jury chose his book as the overall winner.

“I really enjoyed Jimin Kim’s little book,” judge Kim added. “I wanted to peek through the little holes to discover fractions of personality. The title, the story, and the cut-out technique are just in perfect harmony. I’m so proud of the result of the competition!”

ADVERTISING PROFESSIONAL CATEGORY WINNER: Forge & Marrow – Medecine Grown From Science
ADVERTISING PROFESSIONAL CATEGORY WINNER: Forge & Marrow – Medicine Grown From
Science
ADVERTISING NEW TALENT CATEGORY WINNER: Julinu – Maia’s Morning Malaise
ADVERTISING NEW TALENT CATEGORY WINNER: Julinu – Maia’s Morning Malaise

This year’s winning work – over 50 projects – will be shown at an exhibition held at Somerset House’s Embankment East Galleries from August 1-29 (entry is free). It will then tour the UK throughout 2016-17.

The full list of winners is as follows:

Overall Winner New Talent: Jimin Kim
Overall Winner Professional: Jungho Lee
Winner – Advertising New Talent: Julinu
Winner – Advertising Professional: Forge & Morrow
Winner – Books New Talent: Jimin Kim
Winner – Books Professional: Jungho Lee
Winner – Children’s Books New Talent: Ami Shin
Winner – Children’s Books Professional: Alex T. Smith
Winner – Design Professional: Ella Cohen
Winner – Design New Talent: Thoka Maer
Winner – Editorial New Talent: Nancy Liang
Winner – Editorial Professional: Matt Huynh
Winner – Public Realm Professional: Brian Gallagher
Winner – Public Realm Professional: Diego Becas Villegas
Winner – Research & Knowledge Communication New Talent: Eun Jung Bahng
Winner – Research & Knowledge Communication Professional: Florian Bayer
Winner – Self Initiated New Talent: Eunjoo Lee
Winner – Self Initiated Professional: Gigi Rose Gray

More at theaoi.com

PUBLIC REALM PROFESSIONAL CATERGORY WINNER #2: Brian Gallagher – Cromford Mills / Derwent Valley Mills World Heritage Site Gateway Centre
PUBLIC REALM PROFESSIONAL CATERGORY WINNER #2: Brian Gallagher – Cromford Mills / Derwent Valley Mills World Heritage Site Gateway Centre
PUBLIC REALM PROFESSIONAL CATERGORY WINNER #1: Diego Becas Villegas – Nicanor Parra - 100 Years
PUBLIC REALM PROFESSIONAL CATERGORY WINNER #1: Diego Becas Villegas – Nicanor Parra – 100 Years
RESEARCH AND KNOWLEDGE PROFESSIONAL CATEGORY WINNER: Florian Bayer – African Governance Architecture
RESEARCH AND KNOWLEDGE PROFESSIONAL CATEGORY WINNER: Florian Bayer – African Governance Architecture

Restricted Areas – Danila Tkachenko’s photographs of Soviet ruins

According to the Foundation, the wider season of exhibitions and events intends to focus “on utopian public space and the quest for new national identities across the post-Soviet world”.

Along with Tkachenko’s images of deserted structures left to weather ice and snow, Dead Space and Ruins features the work of three other artists working within photography and film who have also been capturing the decaying architecture of the former Soviet Union: Vahram Agasian, Anton Ginzburg and Eric Lusito.

Danila Takatchenko, 12. The world's largest diesel submarine, 2015, from the Restricted Areas series, Courtesy of the artist-CRsite
Danila Tkachenko. Top of post: Deserted observatory; Above: The world’s largest diesel submarine
Danila Tkatchenko, 23. Sarcophagus over a closed shaft which is 4 km deep – was one of the deepest scientific shafts in the world at the time, 2015, from the Restricted Areas series, Courtesy of the artist-CRsite
Danila Tkachenko. Sarcophagus over a closed shaft which is 4km deep – it was one of the deepest scientific shafts in the world at the time
Danila Tkatchenko, 31. Monument to the Conquerors of Space. The rocket on top was made according to the design of German V-2 missile, 2015, from the Restricted Areas series, Courtesy of the artist-CRsite
Danila Tkachenko. Monument to the Conquerors of Space. The rocket on top was made according to the design of German V-2 missile

Tkachenko’s project examines the “utopian strive of humans for technological progress,” he says, and involved visiting long-forgotten, deserted sites across the country. It includes memorials and monuments, observatories, disused aircraft and numerous abandoned buildings (the full series is here).

Power and Architecture is the Calvert 22 Foundation’s second seasonal programme this year and is curated by Programme Manager Will Strong and Creative Director Ekow Eshun. The aim of the series, say the Foundation, is “to explore the design of the built environment and its use as a device of influence, both physically characterising the skyline, and psychologically in relation to the people who live in its shadow”.

Danila Tkachenko, 33. Memorial on a deserted nuclear station. Russia, Voronezh region, 2015, from the Restricted Areas series, Courtesy of the artist-CRsite
Danila Tkachenko. Memorial on a deserted nuclear station
Danila Tkatchenko, 9. Water contamination test at the lake around the previously closed scientific city Chelyabinsk. In 1964 there was the first nuclear catastrophe, equal in scale to Chernobyl-CRsite
Danila Tkachenko. Water contamination test at the lake around the previously closed scientific city Chelyabinsk-40. In 1964 there was the first nuclear catastrophe, one of the largest in history and equal in scale to Chernobyl, but it stayed secret. The city is surrounded by the lakes which are until now contaminated with radiation
Danila Tkatchenko, 18. Headquarters of Communist Party. Bulgaria, Yugoiztochen region, 2015, from the Restricted Areas series, Courtesy of the artist-CRsite
Danila Tkachenko. Monument of the Bulgarian Communist Party

More of Danila Tkachenko’s work is at danilatkachenko.com. Dead Space and Ruins, part two of the Power and Architecture programme, is at the Calvert 22 Foundation until August 7 (the programme runs until October 9), 22 Calvert Avenue, London E2 7JP. (Free entry, Wednesday – Sunday, 12pm – 6pm). Part three is entitled Citizen Activated Space – Museum of Skateboarding and opens on August 11. According to the Calvert 22 Foundation, “the installation by Russian artist Kirill Savchenkov explores the individual’s participation in the activation of public space through skateboarding”. See calvert22.org

Danila Takatchenko, 1. Airplane – amphibia with vertical take-off VVA14. The USSR built only two of them in 1976, one of which has crashed during transportation, 2015, from the Restricted Areas series, Courtesy of the artist. jpg-CRsite
Danila Tkachenko. Airplane – amphibia with vertical take-off VVA14. The USSR built only two of them in 1976, one of which has crashed during transportation
Danila Takatchenko, 2. Former residential buildings in a deserted polar scientific town specialised on biological research, 2015, from the Restricted Areas series, Courtesy of the artist-CRsite
Danila Tkachenko. Former residential buildings in a deserted polar scientific town specialised on biological research

Words by Christoph Niemann

“What can you do with a word?” asks Christoph Niemann in his introduction to his forthcoming illustrated children’s book, Words.

Made as a celebration of both language and art, the book aims to help young readers discover 300 key words in context. “I am inviting kids (and readers of all ages) to intuit and puzzle out meaning,” writes the illustrator and author, “and to see language as a source of ideas and stories”.

words_07
words_04

What’s notable about Niemann’s approach to the more typical A-Z word book is that he has broadened out the usual list of drawn words – apple, boat, cat etc – to include adjectives, verbs and conjunctions, often pairing two things together over a spread so that readers can see the subtle differences (or connections) between them.

words_09
words_10

“Illustrating non-nouns (as well as the obvious verbs and adjectives) was what really drew my to this idea – ‘if’, ‘or’, ‘when’, ‘too’, ‘again’ are more tricky, but much more interesting!” Niemann told CR.

“The selection is loosely based on the [Dr Edward B] Fry list of the most common words, and I felt it was high time that all these small words finally get the recognition that their ubiquity commands.”

words_03
words_08

“For me drawing and writing are very closely related,” Niemann writes on the page on his site about the book. “Both a word and a picture have the power to express extremely complex thoughts and emotions with amazing simplicity.

“Think of the word ‘love’, or a drawing of a smiling face. Being able to understand words and images opens the door to knowledge, communication, and connection to people all over the world.”

Words will be published in October from Greenwillow Books. More details are at Niemann’s site, while the book can also be pre-ordered via Amazon

words_02
words_06
words_01B

Ed Morris’ chilling new video for Massive Attack

Earlier today Massive Attack released a new track, Come Near Me, featuring vocals by Ghostpoet. The accompanying video, written and directed by Ed Morris and produced by Rattling Stick, follows a couple as they walk from a house, into the streets, across parkland, roads and beyond. (The track even fades out midway through before cutting into 1991’s Unfinished Sympathy playing in a car).

While rather unnerving – the woman walks backwards throughout the film – it’s never made clear whether she’s being pursued or is tempting the man to follow her. Suffice to say that, alongside Ghostpoet’s sly, unhurried delivery, the whole thing suits Massive Attack’s dark aesthetic to a tee.

You can watch the video below.

Massive_Attack_Come_Near_Me1
Massive_Attack_Come_Near_Me2

Director: Ed Morris; Executive Producer: Andy Orrick; Producer: Polly du Plessis; Production Company: Rattling Stick; Lighting Cameraman: Franz Lustig; Editor: Flaura Atkinson; Edit House: The Quarry; Sound Company: Smoke and Mirrors; Sound Design/Mixer: Scott Little; Dialogue Writer: Eve Mahoney; Colour: The Mill; Colourist: Seamus O’Kane; VFX & Design: The Mill; Producer: Jack Williams; 2D Artists: Nina Mossand, Dan Adams, Jeanette Eiternes; Motion Graphics: Kwok Fung Lam, Stephanie Dewhirst 

Massive_Attack_Come_Near_Me4
Massive_Attack_Come_Near_Me5
Massive_Attack_Come_Near_Me7

Kai and Sunny bear fruit for Cidre – Stella Artois

Art director Paul Sieka at JKR Global asked the pair to rebrand Cidre – Stella Artois with a clean and minimal look based upon the concept of ‘temptation’. The resulting illustrations run across the packaging of the brand’s five flavours: apple, pear, peach (shown above and below), raspberry and elderflower.

Cidre flavor labels-peach-2000-CRsite

Prior to the new look, Stella’s Cidre range was heavily typographic and more aligned with its parent brand. The redesign sees ‘Cidre’ redrawn in looser, more contemporary type, while the new fruit illustrations offer a stylish punch of bright colour.

Cidre flavor labels-apple-2000-CRsite
Apple-temptation-2000-CRsite

 

Earlier this year, Stella’s rather tone deaf, social media-influenced ‘Be Legacy’ campaign sent many fans of the brand pining for its classic work of old – so its good to see some quality illustration and packaging design turning that short-sightedness around.

See kaiandsunny.com

elderflower-temptation-2000-CRsite
Raspberry-temptation-2000-CRsite
Pear-temptation-2000-CRsite

Scott King launches Service Industries with a new range of tea towels

Artist Scott King has history with the tea towel. As a format ripe for subversion and satire he’s previously created a set dedicated to the press communiqués of the 1970s left wing revolutionary group, The Angry Brigade (2002), as well as a series featuring various ‘quotes’ by a range of philosophers and thinkers – from Wittgenstein to Benjamin and McLuhan (2012).

Scott-King-Service-Industries-Alcohol
Top of post: The Jet Age, hand-coloured with marker pens on white 100% lightweight cotton; illustration by Will Henry, taken from King and Henry’s ‘Anish & Antony Take Afghanistan’ (2014), originally published by JRP|Ringier, Zurich. Above, taken from King’s ‘The Alcoholic’s Coloring Book’ (2008), originally published by White Columns, New York

Service Industries, King’s new product shop created with designer Rhys Atkinson, offers a new set of tea towels emblazoned with artwork that relates to some of the projects he has worked on over the previous years.

For example, one reproduces a panel from his and Will Henry’s comic book satire of public art commissions, Anish & Antony Take Afghanistan (JRP|Ringier); while another continues his series of gig-based artworks – The Jesus and Mary Chain’s infamous North London Polytechnic concert of 15 March 1985, rendered in reductive detail.

Designs for two of King’s other favourites bands (Sleaford Mods and Earl Brutus) are also referenced in the new set.

Scott-King-Service-Industries-Chain
The Jesus and Mary Chain, North London Polytechnic, 15 March 1985

For King, the products sold in gallery and museum shops hold an intriguing allure and have almost become an obsession – “The Mondrian pencil cases at MoMa, the Rothko cushions at Tate Modern … these kind of mementos of your ‘museum experience’,” he says. “I sort of love this stuff – well, I love it and hate it – this kind of ‘half-art’ which is essentially kitsch but is somehow meant to suggest ‘good taste’ or ‘artistic appreciation’.”

As a response, King decided to try and construct an alternative – could you create a store that became a place of critique, where the products were more interesting than the art in the gallery? Service Industries is the result – a space where King can “make the tea towels ‘the art’, rather than the spin-off product of ‘the painting’,” he says. 

Scott-King-Service-Industries-Brutus2
The legend ‘Now Wash Your Hands’ often appeared as a footnote on Earl Brutus’ artwork: a line lifted straight from Izal toilet roll packaging

As for working with tea towels, King says his fascination goes back to seeing his Grandma’s collection reflect some of the places she’d visited (“Bridlington, Torquay and more bizarrely, Toronto”). 

“They’re an old-fashioned form of democratic art in that sense aren’t they?” he says. “Cheap paintings for people who’d never think to – or maybe could never afford to – own an original painting. Similarly, I like the way you still see them in traditional fish and chip shops – grease-stained memories of a seaside past. So the idea to do Service Industries is about that, too.”

New products will be added to the Service Industries site over the next few weeks and announced via Instagram and Twitter. These products include King’s ‘Stop Mumford & Sons’ poster and copies of his record ‘You’re My Favourite Artist‘, alongside mirror tiles, place mats and, naturally, T-shirts.

“Our idea is to create product,” says King, “but hopefully product that’s a bit nastier than most”.

The tea towels are screen printed on white 100% standard premium cotton, 70 x 50cm (£25), except for The Jet Age edition which is for display only (it is coloured with marker pens) and made from white 100% lightweight cotton, 60 x 50cm (£100). See serviceindustries.co.uk and scottking.co.uk

Scott-King-Service-Industries-Sleaford-Mods
Taken from a series of cartoons created for the band by Scott King and Will Henry

Should museums be recreating the past?

Artistic responses to war and suffering are as old as human conflict. From plays to paintings, films to poetry, creativity has always emerged from destructive acts – much of the art made in the first half of the 20th century is testament to that. But how should we respond if the destruction targets culture itself? Is the instinct to repair and rebuild the right one?

Ironically, while Islamic State continues to erase significant parts of Middle Eastern heritage at an alarming rate – from bringing down ancient structures in Syria, to destroying mosques, shrines and temples in Iraq – we are also witnessing the deployment of digital technologies that have the potential to record these sites in unprecedented detail, to render them in three dimensions and to produce remarkable facsimiles. Over the last few years, a new era of preservation, conservation and recreation has emerged alongside renewed debate about the very act of remaking cultural artefacts.

Weston Cast Court Victoria and Albert Museum
Weston Cast Court, V&A © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

When exhibition ‘The Missing: Rebuilding the Past’ opened at the Jessica Carlisle Gallery in London in April, the show brought together several examples of work by artists and scholars who, the gallery claimed, “resist the destruction of cultural heritage wrought by the so-called Islamic State”. The chosen mode of resistance was artistic production or, more accurately, reproduction. Objects on display included a 3D-printed scale model of the Triumphal Arch from Palmyra – the ancient site destroyed by Isis in 2015 – produced by the Million Image Database, and artist Piers Secunda’s replica of a Mesopotamian head strewn with bullet holes, themselves cast from a school building in Iraqi Kurdistan.

Factum Arte’s Lucida 3D scanner recording works by Francesco del Cossa
Factum Arte’s Lucida 3D scanner recording works by Francesco del Cossa

While an artistic reaction resulting in a new work of art is one thing, replicating an object or structure that has been destroyed – or copying it before it is lost – opens up many more questions. Archaeologists, technicians, artists and fabricators have found themselves at the forefront of the ascent of digital conservation, battling against violent ideologies on the one hand and environmental factors, from natural disasters and pollution to the effects of mass tourism, on the other. The likes of crowdsourcing, hi-res scanning, 3D rendering and photogrammetry are increasingly becoming part of the methodology of preserving culture in the 21st century.

At the 15th Architecture Biennale in Venice, a special project by the Biennale and the V&A Museum in the Applied Arts Pavilion currently explores the threats facing the preservation of global heritage sites and how the production of copies can aid in the preservation of cultural artefacts. ‘A World of Fragile Parts’ is curated by the V&A’s Brendan Cormier and harks back to the museum’s own associations with the production of copies and replicas.

#NewPalmyra Temple of Bel model render by CEBAS VT (through Moskito)
#NewPalmyra Temple of Bel model render by CEBAS VT (through Moskito)

Opened in 1873, the V&A’s Cast Courts still contain one of the best collections of casts of post-classical European sculpture and feature some of the museum’s largest objects, including two casts of the Trajan’s Column from Rome. The V&A claims that these 1st-century reliefs, cast in the 1860s, “can be studied more easily than on the original in Rome” and that “the definition of many of the scenes is clearer than on the marble column, since they have been protected from later pollution and weathering”.

Indeed, many of the casts featured in collections around the world have now survived longer than their originals and copies have therefore become valuable historical records in themselves. At the Biennale, as Griselda Murray Brown noted in the Financial Times, there is an interesting juxtaposition of two replicated panels from the doors to the Basilica of San Petronio in Bologna – a 19th-century cast is displayed next to a 3D-printed version of the same section produced by Factum Arte, one of the most interesting practitioners in digital preservation.

With its sister organisation, the Factum Foundation, the Madrid, Milan and London-based company has used digital technology since 2001 to conserve cultural heritage. It has worked on a wide range of projects, from recording paintings, maps and friezes to creating a full-size facsimile of Tutankhamun’s burial chamber (so that the deteriorating original can be closed to the public) and scanning the intricate
zoomorphic motifs on a series of oak doors from the mosque at Kala-Koreysh near the village of Kubachi in Daghestan. While visiting the mosque site, Factum Arte also recorded the graveyard using aerial photogrammetry and scanned tombstones that had been stored in the mausoleum, resulting in a beautiful, high-resolution 3D render of the only painted stone on the site.

Factum documenting Kala-Koreysh mosque
Factum documenting Kala-Koreysh mosque

“Apart from the loss of the architectural richness and imagination of the place, the loss of old Kubachi would represent the loss of a vast number of entirely unrecorded carved stones of historical and cultural significance,” says the Foundation in its post about the project. “In the past, villagers reused the old carved stones in the walls of new houses; now, as old Kubachi falls apart, the permanence of the stones is no longer ensured.” At the old mosque, two carved stones have been recorded using photogrammetry, while others have been photographed as an example of the kind of documentary work that Factum believes urgently needs to be carried out. “We hope that the data from the project will be useful to scholars studying the Northern Caucasus, but also that it will prove equally interesting for the general public, both local and international.”

At the core of Factum Arte’s work is the Lucida 3D Scanner, a piece of equipment that uses raw video to capture a range of different surfaces, including details of the object’s relief and finish. Developed by Manuel Franquelo, co-founder of Factum Arte with artist Adam Lowe, objects, paintings and documents can be scanned in incredible detail. Recorded in 2013, the Hereford Mappa Mundi was documented with the Lucida’s low-intensity laser light that films continuously using black and white video cameras, Factum explains on its web page about the project. Each frame was then ‘post-processed’ to create the high resolution three-dimensional record of the 13th-century map.

Exhibits from ‘A World of Fragile Parts’
Exhibits from ‘A World of Fragile Parts’

Just as casting in the 19th-century was a way of bringing cultural artefacts to people who would otherwise be unable to experience them, Factum Arte’s recording of these sites is a way of ensuring they exist in the future, even as the original materials perish over time. In a further echo of the dissemination of culture practiced by the group, the software that Factum Arte has pioneered will also be available to all, they claim, while the Foundation also hopes to provide museums with the ability to record their own objects by giving them high-tech scanners.

Similarly, the Institute for Digital Archaeology – founders of the Million Image Database – is involved in crowdsourcing data from sites in the Middle East and north Africa, but with a view to replicating structures in solid materials, such as stone. Having given out 5,000 lightweight 3D cameras to people in and around conflict zones, this method of capture (and the process of turning that data into a physical object), has perhaps gained the most publicity internationally, thanks to the production of a six-metre version of the Triumphal Arch, laser-cut from Egyptian sandstone, and installed in London’s Trafalgar Square for two days last May, before a planned move to Dubai, New York and Palmyra. The IDA has already worked on several projects that aim to preserve cultural artefacts, for example, such as making recordings of the paintings in the Marsoulas Caves in the south west of France. Yet the potential to actually recreate a physical site, less than a year after its destruction, is startlingly new territory.

Palmyrene column capital (Temple of Bel) by #NewPalmyra
Palmyrene column capital (Temple of Bel) by #NewPalmyra

The advances being made in 3D printing also make this an increasingly contentious area: if we can accurately recreate a cultural treasure from the Syrian desert, for example, is it right that we go ahead and do so? On sketchfab.com, users can now download 56 different objects, mainly busts and figures, from the British Museum’s collection and print them in 3D. Thus, on one level, access to replicating artefacts from antiquity
has become more open and straightforward. But the ability to remake significant structures on the sites where they once existed is clearly a process that requires an awareness of cultural sensitivities, not to mention a desire to collaborate with local communities and organisations.

As Robert Bevan, author of The Destruction of Memory, wrote in the Evening Standard, UNESCO’s take on the matter of rebuilding sites came to light when it rejected the idea that the Buddhas of Bamiyan in Hazarajat, Afghanistan, destroyed by the Taliban in 2001, could be reconstructed using what was left of the originals – a process known as ‘anastylosis’. “Better that the Buddhas’ empty niches stand as a memorial to the horrors of wanton destruction, it was argued,” Bevan noted. “Rebuilding – whether by the perpetrators or their victims – can serve to mask the genuine, if unpalatable, past; erasing the gaps, the voids, the ruination that bears witness to traumatic events. It can conceal the reality of the present.” Yet the act of remaking, Bevan conceded, is a defiant counter to the wider programme of erasure of ethnic and religious traditions being carried out by Isis – and therefore “‘critical reconstruction’ remains the most honest course of action”.

Another approach is to look to reconstruct a site in virtual space. #NewPalmyra is an open source digital archaeology project to which users can upload pre-destruction images of Palmyra and contribute to an increasing bank of visual data that can then be turned into 3D renders. The organisation’s appeal – “Help us use digital tools to build a future #NewPalmyra from the past” – continues the work of the Syrian open access activist, Bassel Khartabil, who was arrested by government forces in 2012 and has been missing since October 2015 after he was transferred to an unknown location. Build data for Palmyra’s Triumphal Arch and the Temple of Baal Shamin is on newpalmyra.org, while the project’s social channels show followers printing off models of the structures, actively engaged in conserving the ancient site.

With current technological advances, the ability to record our culture and ensure it can be enjoyed by future generations has never been easier. While the intentions of the #NewPalmyra project sound incredibly progressive, as with many of its contemporaries in this new world of digital preservation, its aims in fact link back to the efforts made in the 19th-century to conserve, save and share the things we make.

Lead image: Casts on show as part of the V&A’s ‘A World of Fragile Parts’ exhibition at the Architecture Biennale in Venice. Photographs © Andrea Avezzù (La Biennale di Venezia), labiennale.org

See digitalarchaeology.org.uk, factum-arte.com, newpalmyra.org

You can email XL artist Powell for the details on his new record, or just to chat

The billboards, which have appeared in London and New York, simply state Powell‘s email – powell@xlrecordings.com – the idea being that interested parties (those who presumably make the connection between his name and that of the well known label) should just contact him if they want to know more.

One fan who did found out about Powell’s forthcoming debut album before the music press – Pitchfork were tipped off by the fan and then broke the news more widely.

And if you do email the address, you receive an auto-reply message and can then enjoy a conversation with the man himself. Members of the music press also receive a jpg of a tips sheet ‘for maximising your interview with Powell’. It contains advice for warm-up questions and interview etiquette with “one of the busiest men in contemporary post-EDM-slash-Drill-and-Bass”.

When I wrote to him earlier, initially he didn’t even mention his forthcoming album, but instead responded to a few brief points about his use of the media – and what’s happened as a result of the new campaign. Powell says he’s had around 600 different email conversations with people so far.

Powell-Albini-email
Top of post: Powell’s latest billboard, featuring just his email address, in London. Above: Powell’s billboard from last year, featuring the text of an email to him from producer Steve Albini

Last year, Powell unveiled a billboard featuring the text of an email he’d received from producer Steve Albini in response to a request to use a sample of his vocals from a live performance of his band, Big Black. The email gave Powell permission to use the clip but Albini also issued a fairly forthright view of contemporary dance music and club culture – he is not a fan.

In this latest campaign, while a pair of billboards will only get so much passing traffic – and within that a handful of people will get who he is – the real leg work is done online, with images of the posters doing the rounds on social media.

But the clever bit is that only by coming off social media – and going old school with email – can you have a proper conversation with him and even the low-down on his latest work. For fans of an artist’s music, that’s still a pretty unique thing.

And the album? Well, that’s officially announced next week, according to Powell. It’s called Sport, he says, and will be out in October.

Three of Powell’s previous tracks are at the XL site, xlrecordings.com. Powell is on Twitter at @odbpowell

PowellNYC2-CRsite
Powell’s latest billboard in New York

St Andrews Photography Festival launches in August

St Andrews’ links to photography date back to the mid-19th century and the pioneering calotype print work of Dr John Adamson, the physician and curator. Adamson went on to teach the process to his brother, Robert, who despite his premature death (he was only 26), created around 2,500 calotype portraits.

William Henry Fox Talbot’s calotype process had been patented in 1841 – but as the patent did not apply in Scotland, Dr Adamson was able to develop his own technique and pave the way for other Scottish names such as David Octavius Hill, who formed a partnership with Robert Adamson in 1843; Thomas Rodger, who set up the first photographic studio in St Andrews; and Sir David Brewster, a close friend of Fox Talbot’s.

Carrying peats, Fladday, Harris, 1937. By Robert Moyes Adam. Image courtesy of University of St Andrews Library: RMA-H-5623
Top of post: Rag and Bone men, Rye Hill, Newcastle, 1968. By Carolyn Scott. © Carolyn Scott. Image courtesy St Andrews University Library: 2010-3-146. Above: Carrying peats, Fladday, Harris, 1937. By Robert Moyes Adam. Image courtesy of University of St Andrews Library: RMA-H-5623
Woman in window, Harris, 1937. By Robert Moyes Adam. Courtesy of the University of St Andrews Library: RMA-H-5591.X
Woman in window, Harris, 1937. By Robert Moyes Adam. Courtesy of the University of St Andrews Library: RMA-H-5591.X

BID St Andrews, the town’s business improvement body, has worked with local businesses and the University to set up the new festival which will to honour these links to photography while focusing on contemporary talent.

According to the organisers, fifteen local businesses will host small-scale exhibitions, “alongside tours, seminars, workshops and talks including guest photographers as well as workshops to demonstrate a variety of photographic processes including calotype and collodion – two of the earliest and those used by the town’s renowned pioneers of the art”.

Four gentlemen golfers in a Car, St Andrews, 1904. By John Fairweather, held in Cowie Collection. Courtesy of the University of St Andrews Library: GMC-F-28
Four gentlemen golfers in a Car, St Andrews, 1904. By John Fairweather, held in Cowie Collection. Courtesy of the University of St Andrews Library: GMC-F-28
Mallorca, 1982. By David Peat. © David Peat Estate, courtesy of St Andrews University Library
Mallorca, 1982. By David Peat. © David Peat Estate, courtesy of St Andrews University Library

“The first six-week-long festival – from August 1 to September 11 – will see events and exhibitions focus on the earliest days of photography in StAndrews as well as Scottish documentary photography over the last 175 years and contemporary photography.”

Exhibitions will include ‘175 Years of Scottish Photography’; a 40th Anniversary retrospective of Edinburgh’s Stills Gallery; a show of work by pioneers Thomas Rodger and Robert Moyes Adam; and exhibits by press photographers George M. Cowie and Harry Papadopoulos, documentary photographers Franki Raffles, David Peat, Dr Hamish Brown MBE, Sean Dooley and Document Scotland (Colin McPherson, Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert, Sophie Gerrard and Stephen McLaren), alongside artists Calum Colvin RSA OBE, Kit Martin and Keny Drew.

Dr John Adamson’s home on South Street, St Andrews, 1862. By John Adamson. Courtesy of the University of St Andrews Library: ALB-8-67
Dr John Adamson’s home on South Street, St Andrews, 1862. By John Adamson. Courtesy of the University of St Andrews Library: ALB-8-67
End of the tarmac road, Menie, Aberdeenshire, 2011. By Alicia Bruce. © Alicia Bruce, TRUMPED project
End of the tarmac road, Menie, Aberdeenshire, 2011. By Alicia Bruce. © Alicia Bruce, TRUMPED project

“There will also be a number of events,” say the organisers, “including a ‘Become a Street Photographer’ youth workshop, a Victorian Tintype Studio, a photographic tour of St Andrews and talks by photographers including Hamish Brown on his travels in Morocco”.

The St Andrews Photography Festival will run from 1 August to 11 September 2016. facebook.com/StAndPhotoFest

“We begin again” – Dance Ink magazine relaunches

When Dance Ink emerged in 1989, it was a very different kind of arts publication. It aimed to reflect the contemporary dance community directly by reproducing new performance pieces that had been commissioned specifically for the pages of the magazine.

Twenty years after closing in 1996, the quarterly is returning, its revival “inspired by a new generation of dancers and performers and the resurgence in independent print media”, say its designers, Pentagram.

The issue opens with a quote by Merce Cunningham
Top of post: Cover of the first issue of the new Dance Ink features Silas Riener performing Merce Cunningham’s ‘Changeling’. Above: The issue opens with a quote by Merce Cunningham

In fact, Dance Ink is relaunching with issue 8 under the steer of its original editor and designer, Abbott Miller, and publisher Patsy Tarr, who in the late 1980s first conceived of the publication as a unique performance space in its own right. The new-look magazine widens the physical scope of the title to include a series of posters and murals.

A year after Dance Ink ceased its original run, Tarr launched 2wice, a new bi-annual visual culture magazine edited and designed by Miller. As time went on the two founders began commissioning more performance-based pieces for 2wice, ideas that reflected back to Dance Ink. From 2011, 2wice used the iPad screen as a new kind of performance space via a series of apps.

Silas Riener performs in Tompkins Square Park in one of three pieces in the issue
Silas Riener performs in Tompkins Square Park in one of three pieces in the issue
Opening spread of 'Everywhere We Go', featuring the choreography of Justin Peck
Opening spread of ‘Everywhere We Go’, featuring the choreography of Justin Peck

On the Pentagram blog, Miller describes how returning to Dance Ink in 2016 feels particularly timely given the resurgence in indie magazine publishing. “In many ways, it helped lay the foundation for these beautifully produced, and sporadically published, art titles,” he says. “I kept wondering, what would Dance Ink look like today?”

Amar Ramasar, principal dancer with the New York City Ballet
Amar Ramasar, principal dancer with the New York City Ballet
Adrian Danchig-Waring, principal dancer with the New York City Ballet
Adrian Danchig-Waring, principal dancer with the New York City Ballet
Silas Riener joins Ramasar and Danchig-Waring in the sequence
Silas Riener joins Ramasar and Danchig-Waring in the sequence

Housed in a clear sleeve, the design of the magazine “plays with the effect of transparency of ink on the page, suggesting layers of performance and motion,” say Pentagram. “The format continues the tradition of 2wice’s later issues, which mainly consisted of a single collaboration with a photographer and performer. As with 2wice, the look of the magazine will vary with every issue.”

The new issue also features three of the most acclaimed dancers working today: “Amar Ramasar and Adrian Danchig-Waring, two of the principal dancers from the New York City Ballet, performing choreography by Justin Peck, the Ballet’s resident choreographer; and Silas Riener, the final dancer to join the Merce Cunningham Company, who danced with the group from 2007 until its official closure in 2011. The issue was photographed by Christian Witkin, a frequent collaborator with 2wice, working here for the first time with Dance Ink”.

Silas Riener dances 'Changeling', a signature work by Merce Cunningham
Silas Riener dances ‘Changeling’, a signature work by Merce Cunningham
Riener wears a costume originally designed by Robert Rauschenberg
Riener wears a costume originally designed by Robert Rauschenberg
The issue extends to posters and custom mural installations, announced in the back pages
The issue extends to posters and custom mural installations, announced in the back pages

The cover of the new issue features an image from ‘Changeling’, an early work by Cunningham, performed here by Riener. “First created in 1957, the performance was considered ‘lost’ and only known through a few iconic photographs until a 1958 film recently resurfaced in a German archive, enabling the choreography to be restaged,” Pentagram explain.

In the Dance Ink portfolio, Riener wears a Robert Rauschenberg-designed costume (Rauschenberg was a close collaborator of Cunningham’s) and recreates poses from the original photographs, forming the only contemporary images of the work.

Custom mural installation featuring the images from 'Changeling'
Custom mural installation featuring the images from ‘Changeling’
Posters available to order
Posters available to order

Two large-scale posters will be produced from every issue, and a pattern of images or a single image can be installed as a custom mural (both shown, above). These are available in a collaboration between Dance Ink and Dodge Chrome and can be ordered via the 2wice site. Dance Ink is limited to an edition of 500 and can be purchased online at 2wice.org. See pentagram.com

Portrait of the artist Charles Atlas on the cover of the Winter 1993 issue, photographed by Josef Astor
Portrait of the artist Charles Atlas on the cover of the Winter 1993 issue, photographed by Josef Astor
Photographs of dancer Lance Gries by Stewart Shining from the Winter 1993 issue
Photographs of dancer Lance Gries by Stewart Shining from the Winter 1993 issue
Cover of the Summer 1994 issue
Cover of the Summer 1994 issue
Flamenco dance legend Pilar Rioja photographed by K. C. Bailey in a 1995 issue
Flamenco dance legend Pilar Rioja photographed by K. C. Bailey in a 1995 issue
Cover of the Fall 1994 issue featuring the choreographer Ralph Lemon photographed by Andrew Eccles
Cover of the Fall 1994 issue featuring the choreographer Ralph Lemon photographed by Andrew Eccles
Spread from the Summer 1996 issue featuring the dancer Frédéric Gafner photographed by Andrew Eccles
Spread from the Summer 1996 issue featuring the dancer Frédéric Gafner photographed by Andrew Eccles
Cover of the Winter 1994 issue featuring a gown by Charles James photographed by Joanne Savio
Cover of the Winter 1994 issue featuring a gown by Charles James photographed by Joanne Savio
Diamanda Galás in a spread from a 1993 issue
Diamanda Galás in a spread from a 1993 issue

Spray paint and sea spray – Rockaway! installation unveiled in New York

Working over a base coat of white paint, Grosse applied three different hues of red with an industrial spray gun over a period of seven days.

Rushing over the structure like a wave, the paint isn’t just confined to the interior and exterior of the building but covers the surrounding pavement, sand and foliage.

Rockaway_Katharina_Grosse8
Top of post and above: Rockaway! featuring site-specific installation by Katharina Grosse. Image courtesy the artist and MoMA PS1. Photo by Pablo Enriquez
Rockaway_Katharina_Grosse7
Rockaway! featuring site-specific installation by Katharina Grosse. Image courtesy the artist and MoMA PS1. Photo by Pablo Enriquez

The project is part of MoMA PS1’s ongoing art programme in the Rockaways area, a collaboration which began in 2012 during the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy as museum staff and volunteers brought help to the community.

According to the museum, its work with Rockaway Artists Alliance and NYC Parks and Recreation was further strengthened in 2013 with the construction of the VW Dome 2, “a temporary structure, which was erected on Beach 95th Street in Rockaway Beach, and served as a cultural and community centre, and emerged as a central part of relief and volunteer efforts in the months following the hurricane”.

Grosse’s work at Fort Tilden is also temporary – the painted building will eventually be demolished, according to the museum.

Rockaway_Katharina_Grosse10
Rockaway! featuring site-specific installation by Katharina Grosse. Image courtesy the artist and MoMA PS1. Photo by Pablo Enriquez
Rockaway_Katharina_Grosse3
Rockaway! featuring site-specific installation by Katharina Grosse. Image courtesy the artist and MoMA PS1. Photo by Pablo Enriquez

Rockaway! is organised in collaboration with the Rockaway Artists Alliance, Jamaica Bay-Rockaway Parks Conservancy, National Park Service, Central Park Conservancy, NYC Parks & Recreation and Rockaway Beach Surf Club. Fort Tilden exhibits are open to the public free of charge on Thursday, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, midday-6 PM

Rockaway_Katharina_Grosse6
Rockaway! featuring site-specific installation by Katharina Grosse. Image courtesy the artist and MoMA PS1. Photo by Pablo Enriquez
Rockaway_Katharina_Grosse2
Rockaway! featuring site-specific installation by Katharina Grosse. Image courtesy the artist and MoMA PS1. Photo by Pablo Enriquez
Rockaway_Katharina_Grosse1
Rockaway! featuring site-specific installation by Katharina Grosse. Image courtesy the artist and MoMA PS1. Photo by Pablo Enriquez

Daydreaming with Stanley Kubrick

Presented by UNKLE and Mo’Wax-founder James Lavelle (who has curated the show with James Putman), Daydreaming with Stanley Kubrick assembles 50 works by a range of artists and filmmakers, actors and musicians.

In a very deliberate way, the exhibition finds space for all the constituent parts of Kubrick’s filmmaking; so there are pieces that look like set design, soundtracks that float around the rooms and corridors, alongside works that take a single visual influence from the director’s art as their starting point.

Reflecting the wide appeal of his films and the impact his command of image-making has had on our visual culture, Kubrick’s hand comes through in a number of different ways.

IMAGE FREE TO USE IN CONNECTION WITH THIS EXHIBITION ONLY© Licensed to London News Pictures. Works by artists Philip Castle and Paul Insect are shown at the exhibition Daydreaming with Stanley Kubrick in partnership with Canon at Somerset House in London. The show opens on July 6, 2016 and runs until August 24, 2016. The exhibition features 50 works inspired by the legendary film director from a host of contemporary artists, musicians and filmmakers. London, UK. Photo credit: Peter Macdiarmid/LNP
At top of post: PYRE by Stuart Haygarth, a glowing tower of electric fires – with reference to The Shining – at Daydreaming with Stanley Kubrick in partnership with Canon at Somerset House in London. Above: Works by artists Philip Castle and Paul Insect. Photos: Peter Macdiarmid/LNP
IMAGE FREE TO USE IN CONNECTION WITH THIS EXHIBITION ONLY© Licensed to London News Pictures. In Consolus-Full of Hope and Full of Fear by artists James Lavelle and John Isaacs featuring Azzi Glasser is shown at the exhibition Daydreaming with Stanley Kubrick in partnership with Canon at Somerset House in London. The show opens on July 6, 2016 and runs until August 24, 2016. The exhibition features 50 works inspired by the legendary film director from a host of contemporary artists, musicians and filmmakers. London, UK. Photo credit: Peter Macdiarmid/LNP
In Consolus-Full of Hope and Full of Fear by artists James Lavelle and John Isaacs featuring Azzi Glasser. Photo: Peter Macdiarmid/LNP

Some artists have naturally taken his films as inspiration, calling up specific scenes or characters from some of his most celebrated projects. There are pieces based on the monolith and the ‘stargate’ sequence from 2001: A Space Odyssey, for example, or the use of pattern and symmetry in The Shining. Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin’s The Shining Carpet (WT) comes straight from the Overlook Hotel and occupies an entire corridor of the show space.

Many of Kubrick’s more familiar visual motifs are also explored. Eyes are prevalent, from the cog-like eyelashes worn by Alex in A Clockwork Orange (a device used across the comms material created for the show by Marwan Kaabour at Barnbrook) and Koen Vanmechelen’s Encounter – CCP film, to the eye of Kubrick’s own camera – a exact replica of which comes alive in Nancy Fouts’ ‘breathing’ version.

There are singular references to objects from the films, too. One of the most potent is Polly Morgan’s surrealist take on the codpieces worn by Alex’s droogs that takes the form of a snake wedged tightly in a concrete triangle. Stuart Haygarth’s PYRE takes a single fireplace from The Shining and multiplies it into a mountain of heat.

IMAGE FREE TO USE IN CONNECTION WITH THIS EXHIBITION ONLY© Licensed to London News Pictures. A visitor views Beyond the Infinite, 2016 by artist Doug Foster at the exhibition Daydreaming with Stanley Kubrick in partnership with Canon at Somerset House in London. The show opens on July 6, 2016 and runs until August 24, 2016. The exhibition features 50 works inspired by the legendary film director from a host of contemporary artists, musicians and filmmakers. London, UK. Photo credit: Peter Macdiarmid/LNP
A visitor views Beyond the Infinite, 2016 by artist Doug Foster. Photo: Peter Macdiarmid/LNP
IMAGE FREE TO USE IN CONNECTION WITH THIS EXHIBITION ONLY© Licensed to London News Pictures. The Second Law by Paul Fryer at the exhibition Daydreaming with Stanley Kubrick in partnership with Canon at Somerset House in London. The work is of a realistic waxwork figure depicting Stanley Kubrick in a glass fronted freezer covered in ice and snow in reference to the final scene of The Shining. The show opens on July 6, 2016 and runs until August 24, 2016. The exhibition features 50 works inspired by the legendary film director from a host of contemporary artists, musicians and filmmakers. London, UK. Photo credit: Peter Macdiarmid/LNP
The Second Law by Paul Fryer, a realistic waxwork figure depicting Stanley Kubrick in a glass fronted freezer covered in ice and snow in reference to the final scene of The Shining. Photo: Peter Macdiarmid/LNP

Other artists have focused in on the director himself. Paul Fryer’s lifelike waxwork of Kubrick in an upright freezer is a nod to the fate of Jack Torrance in the closing scenes of The Shining, while Chris Levine’s intriguing light work, Mr Kubrick is Looking, reveals a fleeting image of the director’s ghost-like face which can only be detected in the viewer’s peripheral vision.

While Samantha Morton and Douglas Hart’s film, Anywhere Out of This World, evokes the impact that 2001 had on the young would-be actress, even projects that Kubrick didn’t get around to making serve as an influence. Jane and Louise Wilson’s contribution to the show is a video piece that uses stills of Johanna ter Steege, the leading actress that the director had in mind for his unrealised film, Aryan Papers.

IMAGE FREE TO USE IN CONNECTION WITH THIS EXHIBITION ONLY© Licensed to London News Pictures. Twilight by artist Doug Aitken is refelected in infinity mirrors at the exhibition Daydreaming with Stanley Kubrick in partnership with Canon at Somerset House in London. The show opens on July 6, 2016 and runs until August 24, 2016. The exhibition features 50 works inspired by the legendary film director from a host of contemporary artists, musicians and filmmakers. London, UK. Photo credit: Peter Macdiarmid/LNP
Twilight by artist Doug Aitken is reflected in infinity mirrors. Photo: Peter Macdiarmid/LNP
IMAGE FREE TO USE IN CONNECTION WITH THIS EXHIBITION ONLY© Licensed to London News Pictures. Requiem for 114 radios by artists Iain Forsyth and Jane Pollard part of an installation at the exhibition Daydreaming with Stanley Kubrick in partnership with Canon at Somerset House in London. The show opens on July 6, 2016 and runs until August 24, 2016. The exhibition features 50 works inspired by the legendary film director from a host of contemporary artists, musicians and filmmakers. London, UK. Photo credit: Peter Macdiarmid/LNP
Detail of Requiem for 114 radios by artists Iain Forsyth and Jane Pollard. Photo: Peter Macdiarmid/LNP

With Lavelle at the helm, music also features heavily throughout the show and the way sounds seep in and out of the rooms adds an eerie quality. At the show’s entrance, a painting of Kubrick in the garden of his Hertfordshire home by his widow Christiane is bathed in the sound of a choral Dies Irae floating in from an adjoining space.

Iain Forsyth and Jane Pollard’s Requiem for 114 Radios is one of the show’s stand-out pieces and features a choir of voices broadcasting from banks of humming analogue radio equipment (Kubrick used Dies Irae, the Catholic Requiem Mass, in both The Shining and A Clockwork Orange).

Inevitably, the works that are given a room to themselves seem to hold more power here. In particular, Mat Collishaw’s piece in the first room, which consists of space helmet with a film playing inside of several chimps peering down the camera (and therefore looking out at us) has a totemic power. Only when the viewer moves around the case does the skull inside the helmet reveal itself more clearly.

There is also a wealth of immersive video art here, from the inner/outer space journey of Beyond the Infinite by Doug Foster to The Corridor by Toby Dye, a multi-projection film which accompanies the UNKLE track, Lonely Soul. (Lavelle had apparently successfully approached Kubrick to work on a video for the song in the late 1990s, while he was making Eyes Wide Shut, but the director died before it could be planned in more detail.)

IMAGE FREE TO USE IN CONNECTION WITH THIS EXHIBITION ONLY© Licensed to London News Pictures. The Corridor, 2016 - a multi-screen projection starring Joanna Lumley and Aidan Gillen is shown at the exhibition Daydreaming with Stanley Kubrick in partnership with Canon at Somerset House in London. The show opens on July 6, 2016 and runs until August 24, 2016. The exhibition features 50 works inspired by the legendary film director from a host of contemporary artists, musicians and filmmakers. London, UK. Photo credit: Peter Macdiarmid/LNP
The Corridor, 2016 – a multi-screen projection starring Joanna Lumley and Aidan Gillen. Photo credit: Peter Macdiarmid/LNP

The exhibition’s final room shows that the concerns raised in Kubrick’s 1964 film, Dr Strangelove, are still very much in the air, channeled here in the monochrome work of Peter Kennard. Images from the film and Kennard’s own striking protest graphics intermingle with business cards from a range of multinational corporations.

It’s a more sombre note to end on than the rest of the work in Dreaming with… would have us believe, but it suggests that beyond the complex visual language that Kubrick established, what also lives on is a questioning spirit that we can take influence from – and which now feels more important than ever to retain.

Daydreaming with Stanley Kubrick is at Somerset House in London from July 6 until August 24. See daydreamingwith.com and somersethouse.org.uk.

IMAGE FREE TO USE IN CONNECTION WITH THIS EXHIBITION ONLY© Licensed to London News Pictures. Trident; A Strange Love, 2013-2016 by artist Peter Kennard juxtaposes images taken from Dr Strangelove with photographs of contemporary world leaders at the exhibition Daydreaming with Stanley Kubrick in partnership with Canon at Somerset House in London. The show opens on July 6, 2016 and runs until August 24, 2016. The exhibition features 50 works inspired by the legendary film director from a host of contemporary artists, musicians and filmmakers. London, UK. Photo credit: Peter Macdiarmid/LNP
Trident; A Strange Love, 2013-2016 by artist Peter Kennard juxtaposes images taken from Dr Strangelove with photographs of contemporary world leaders. Photo: Peter Macdiarmid/LNP

Contributing artists in include Adam Broomberg & Oliver Chanarin / Carl Craig / Charlotte Colbert / Chris Levine / Christiane Kubrick / David Nicholson / Dexter Navy / Doug Foster / Doug Aitken / Futura / Gavin Turk / Harland Miller / Haroon Mirza & Anish Kapoor / Iain Forsyth & Jane Pollard / Invader / Jamie Shovlin / Jane & Louise Wilson / Jason Shulman / Jocelyn Pook / John Isaacs & James Lavelle with Azzi Glasser / Jonas Burgert / Joseph Kosuth / Julian Rosefeldt / Keaton Henson / Koen Vanmechelen / Marc Quinn / Mark Karasick / Mat Chivers / Mat Collishaw / Max Richter / Michael Nyman / Mick Jones / Nancy Fouts / Nathan Coley / Norbert Schoerner / Paul Fryer / Paul Insect / Peter Kennard / Philip Castle / Philip Shepherd / Pink Twins / Polly Morgan / Rachel Howard / Rut Blees Luxemburg / Samantha Morton & Douglas Hart / Sarah Lucas/ Seamus Farrell / Stuart Haygarth / Thomas Bangalter / Toby Dye / Warren du Preez & Nick Thornton Jones

IMAGE FREE TO USE IN CONNECTION WITH THIS EXHIBITION ONLY© Licensed to London News Pictures. The Shining Carpet (WT) by Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin lines the floors at the exhibition Daydreaming with Stanley Kubrick in partnership with Canon at Somerset House in London. The show opens on July 6, 2016 and runs until August 24, 2016. The exhibition features 50 works inspired by the legendary film director from a host of contemporary artists, musicians and filmmakers. London, UK. Photo credit: Peter Macdiarmid/LNP
The Shining Carpet (WT) by Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin lines the floors of the exhibition. Photo: Peter Macdiarmid/LNP
1 2 3 47